LADY PIONEERS
B   A   S   K   E   T   B   A   L   L

LADY PIONEERS
BASKETBALL

C     O     A     C     H         R     I     V     E     N     E     S     S

SYSTEM DEFENSE

The S.O.S. Pressure Defense System was constructed by long-time NBA defensive guru Bob Kloppenburg. In addition to coaching for the Cleveland Cavaliers, Denver Nuggets & Toronto Raptors, coach Kloppenburg was the Defensive Coordinator of the Seattle Supersonics during the '90s when their use of the S.O.S. Pressure Defense System helped propel them to multiple 60 win seasons. Additional resources include Bob Kloppenburg's The Encyclopedia of the SOS Defensive System, Advanced SOS Defensive System, SOS Pressure Defense, and George Karl's Defensive Basketball Drills.

Our system uses coach Kloppenburg's S.O.S. foundation and also fuses some elements of the Amoeba Defense popularized by Jerry Tarkanian's UNLV Runnin' Rebels of the early '90s. Ultimately, it is the primary goal of our defense, not just to stop the opponent from scoring, but to create the game tempo we want and to create offense out of our defense. As we say, we want steals, not stops.
 Coach Riveness & Coach Kloppenburg


S.O.S. On Ball Pressure - SET / ON / SMOTHER

Influence the ball to the nearest sideline or baseline checkpoint using the following techniques & commands:

SET - Defensive player assumes "Set" position (nose to chest, one arm's length away, influencing the ball to one side) when the offensive player has the ball but has not used their dribble. We want the offensive player to

ON - Defensive player maintains "On" position (nose to chest, one arm's length away) while the offensive player is dribbling the ball.

SMOTHER - Once the dribble is picked up, the defensive player assumes a "Smother" position (straddling the offensive player's feet, tracing the ball with their hands) forcing a weak pass out of pressure or a 5 second count).

No Middle - No Ball Reversal

Sideline / Baseline Push to Defensive Checkpoints

 Wing Turn

 Wing Cross Switch


S.O.S. Off Ball Pressure - SNUGGLE / OFF / STRIKE

Off ball defenders use the following techniques and commands to apply maximum pressure:

SNUGGLE - Defensive player assumes a "Snuggle Denial" position when the offensive player is one pass away from the ball by having one hand and one foot in the passing lane, nose to chest, and one arm applying contact to the offensive player.

OFF - Defensive players assume the Helpside I position (as diagrammed below) when they are on the weak side of the court (the offensive player is two or more passes away from the ball. Off defenders are always able to see ball and weak side offensive players and are ready to jump the passing lanes once we have forced a weak pass out of pressure.

STRIKE - Once we force a weak pass out of pressure, the off ball defensive players "Strike" the passing lane by jumping through the passing lane to obtain the steal or deflection.

Helpside I

Double I
Triple I
Triangle I - Sideline
Triangle I - Baseline

S.O.S. Contact Switching - SCREEN / OVER / SWITCH

We will use contact switching to defend all on and off ball screens in the attacking area.  These are not soft or lazy switches but contact switches designed to use the opponent's screening action against them and increase the pressure.  Automatic contact switching eliminates the hesitation on the part of the defenders as there is no decision to be made - switching is what we do.

SCREEN, OVER, SWITCH are the basic techniques and terms used for switching action. First, the defender guarding the screen calls out "SCREEN" to alert their teammate of the impending screen, and then jumps "OVER" one stride to make a contact block on the offensive player moving off the screen. For the final action, "SWITCH" is called out as the defender assigned to the screener switches to defend the offensive player coming off the screen while the second defender switches simultaneously to the player setting the screen.

S.O.S. Post Pressure

When the ball is above the free throw line, we defend the post with a SNUGGLE denial on the high side.
When the ball is on the wing, we defend the post with a full contact front and Helpside I.

When the ball is in the corner, we defend the post with a SNUGGLE denial on the baseline side.

If the offensive player sets up in the high post, we defend the high post player with a SNUGGLE denial. In order for this to be effective, the perimeter defender must force the ball to one side of the floor. We cannot allow the offense to play with the ball on top, in the middle of the court. This causes problems for our SNUGGLE denial angles and our Helpside I.

S.O.S. Pressure In The Back Court (41), Mid Court (31), & Half Court (21)

If we don't score and our opponent secures the rebound, the two players nearest to the rebounder immediately apply a double team in the back court. The player nearest the strong side sideline covers any pass attempt up the sideline, the player nearest the weak side sideline covers any pass attempting to reverse the ball back to the middle of the floor or to teh weak side. The shooter, who has covered back and "reloaded" to the top is in position to cover any deep pass over the top.
If we do score and our opponent is forced to inbound the ball, we play the inbound situation first with a "READ" (as diagrammed here). Once we see how the opponent is going to attack our pressure we can adjust our attack to any of the following options: "TRAP", "STAY", "SQUEEZE", "SLIDE", or "BUMP."
41 READ - We run a straight diamond press and read how the opponent is going to try to break the pressure.

41 TRAP - We trap the inbound pass as shown in the diagram above.


41 STAY - If they want to pass back to the inbounder, we can run STAY and play the passing lane instead of trapping

41 SQUEEZE - If they want to pass back to the inbounder, we can run SQUEEZE and trap the inbound pass while "squeezing" up to play the pass back.
41 SLIDE - If the inbounds pass is caught above the volleyball line, we rotate back to a 2-2-1 alignment and trap at midcourt.

41 BUMP - If we call "BUMP" we will rotate back to a 2-2-1 alignment regardless of where the inbounds pass is caught.

31 TRAP - Top player applies 3 quarter court pressure and forces the ball to one side while the wing players "bait" the ball handler into the trap after the midcourt line.
31 SQUEEZE - If they want to reverse the ball through the middle, we can run SQUEEZE and trap while "squeezing" up to play the pass back.
CORNER TRAP - If they get out of the initial trap, we stay in 31 and trap the baseline corner.


21 Initial Set (1-1-2-1 alignment)
21 Wing Pass Rotation
WING DRIVE
WING TRAP ROTATION
WING TRAP
X-CUT ON THE CORNER PASS
CORNER TRAP ROTATION
CORNER PASS HOLD
DEEP CUT ROTATION
SKIP PASS ROTATIONS

                                     ALIGNMENT vs. SPREAD

                          vs. SPREAD: 25 TRAP AFTER 1st PASS

23 ZONE

There are some occasions where we will move away from running our system. Perhaps we are leading by a lot, we've achieved all of our offensive goals, and don't want to embarrass our opponent. Or, maybe we run into a situation where injuries are preventing us from our game plan. In such cases we may elect to pull back defensively and run our 23 zone as diagrammed below.
23 INITIAL ALIGNMENT

23 WING PASS ROTATION

23 BALL ON WING
23 BALL IN CORNER
23 SKIP PASS TO CORNER
23 SKIP PASS TO TOP
23 BALL ON OPPOSITE WING
23 BALL IN OPPOSITE CORNER